2004 Roussanne

Production Notes

The 2004 Tablas Creek Vineyard Roussanne is Tablas Creek’s third national release of its 100% Roussanne. The wine is exuberantly and elegantly in character of the Roussanne grape, with honey, honeysuckle, and pear aromatics, a rich, viscous mouthfeel with just a hint of oak, and a long, lingering finish.

We use most of our Roussanne in our Esprit de Beaucastel Blanc each year. However, we often have some Roussanne lots in the cellar that are so powerfully characteristic of the varietal that we feel they would be too dominant in a blend. In these cases, we reserve a small quantity of this powerful Roussanne for a single-varietal bottling.

Our Roussanne grapes were grown on our 120-acre certified organic estate vineyard.

The 2004 vintage was excellent, with a very early spring balanced by a long, warm (but rarely hot) summer. The extended ripening cycle gave the grapes intense aromatics, pronounced minerality, and good structure. The early spring and moderate summer ripened Roussanne earlier than normal, and we harvested it between September 5th and September 29th.

The Roussanne grapes were whole cluster pressed, and fermented using native yeasts half in stainless steel and half in small French oak barrels. The wine was left on its lees for 6 months, and allowed to complete malolactic fermentation. After fermentation the wines were blended, and bottled in May 2005. The wines underwent only a light cold stabilization before bottling.

Tasting Notes

The 2004 Roussanne is a vibrant expression of the Roussanne grape. Aromas of pear, honeysuckle and hazelnut and spice are followed by a wine of rich texture, honey, pear and lemon zest flavors, moderate acidity and a long minerally finish.

Reviews

[...more recent Tablas Creek press]

Recipe Suggestions

[...more recipes]

Food Pairings

  • Rich shellfish (lobster and crab)
  • Sea Bass
  • Mildly spicy foods (curries, gumbo)
  • Stir-fries in garlic and olive oil
  • Salmon
Roussanne

Not Available for Purchase

$30.00

Blend

  • 100% Roussanne

Technical Notes

  • 14.3% Alcohol by Volume
  • 600 Cases Produced

Downloads

Events

Earth Day Celebration

You're invited to join us for an Earth Day celebration Sunday, April 24 at Tablas Creek Vineyard. Visit the winery all weekend from 10am to 5pm and learn about our organic and Biodynamic viticulture and limestone soils. Taste the wines from the current VINsider Wine Club shipment, and see our biodynamic sheep, alpacas, donkeys and llama! Tours run daily at 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Also, enjoy the high-energy sounds of Bear Market Riot from noon to 3:00 PM on our terraced patio.


Tablas Creek News

$10 Flat-Rate Shipping Ends Sunday, May 1st

Any order you place through 11:59pm on Sunday, May 1st -- from a bottle of wine to two cases or more -- will be shipped anywhere we ship for just $10! The more you order, the more you save, so send wine to yourself, your family or your friends. Buy Wine »

Jason Haas: 2015 Paso Robles Wine Industry Person of the Year

We were proud to learn that Tablas Creek Partner/GM Jason Haas was voted by his peers the 2015 Paso Robles Wine Industry Person of the Year.  His father, our founder Robert Haas, wrote this appreciation on our blog.

Wine Advocate: 15 Wines 90+ Points

In Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (Issue 220) 15 Tablas wines topped 90 points, including 2014 Esprit de Tablas (93-96), 2013 Panoplie (94-96), and 2014 Panoplie (95-97). Read the review » More press »

 


On the Tablas Blog

Spring Cleaning in the Vineyard: How Eliminating Surface Grasses Conserves Water

April 27, 2016
Think of each plant that's growing in a given plot of land as like a wick, with its roots delving into the soil for available moisture. If we had overabundant water, we might want to leave some surface weeds to keep levels more reasonable. Instead, in our California climate, eliminating competition from grasses and other surface plants is an essential part of our ability to dry farm. Tilling in the cover crop also allows the insects and microorganisms in the soil to start breaking down the surface biomass accumulated during the winter growth into nutrients that the vines will draw from in the coming months. Finally, the loosening of the soil creates an insulating layer at the surface that helps conserve the water deeper down.  Read More »