2005 Mourvèdre

Production Notes

The 2005 Tablas Creek Vineyard Mourvèdre is Tablas Creek’s third varietal bottling of Mourvèdre. The wine shows the rich cherry, fig, mocha and spice flavors, medium to full body, and a spicy, appealing finish of saddle leather and loam of the Mourvèdre grape.

We use most of our Mourvèdre in our Esprit de Beaucastel each year. However, we feel that this is a grape, often dismissed as “just a blending varietal”, that is capable of making tremendously rich and balanced single-varietal wines as well. When we have particularly intense and characterizing lots of Mourvèdre, we try to reserve a limited quantity for a single-varietal bottling.

Our Mourvèdre grapes were grown on our 120-acre certified organic estate vineyard.

The 2005 vintage was one of nature’s lucky breaks, with excellent quality and higher-than-normal yields. The wet winter of ’04–’05 gave the grapevines ample groundwater, and a warm period in March got the vines off to an early May flowering. The summer was uniformly sunny but relatively cool, and harvest began (relatively late for us) in the 3rd week of September. The grapes spent nearly a month longer than normal on the vine, and the resulting wines were intensely mineral, with good structure and powerful aromatics. The Mourvèdre was harvested (earlier, compared to our other varietals) between October 11th and October 28th.

The Mourvèdre grapes were destemmed and then fermented using native yeasts in a balance of small open-top and enclosed stainless steel tanks. After three weeks, they were pressed and moved to 1200-gallon foudres to complete their fermentation. The Mourvèdre lots were blended in June of 2006, when we added 10% Syrah to give a touch of black fruit and mineral to the wine. It was aged for an additional year in a 1200-gallon foudres and bottled in June 2007. The wine underwent only a light filtration before bottling, and should be expected to throw a sediment over time.

Tasting Notes

The 2005 Mourvèdre displays a classic nose of roasted meats, plums and spice. Juicy and full in the mouth, it features lingering notes of plum, currant, coffee, chocolate and leather, with a long mineral finish. We expect it to drink well for a decade or more.

Reviews

[...more recent Tablas Creek press]

Recipe Suggestions

[...more recipes]

Food Pairings

  • Richly flavored stews
  • Pork chops with fruit reduction
  • Asian preparation of red meats (i.e., beef stir fry)
  • Bittersweet chocolate desserts
Mourvedre

Not Available for Purchase

$40.00

Blend

  • 90% Mourvedre
  • 10% Syrah

Technical Notes

  • 14.3% Alcohol by Volume
  • 500 Cases Produced

Downloads

Events

Paso Robles Wine Festival

You're invited to join us for a weekend-long Wine Festival celebration Friday, May 20th through Sunday, May 22nd. Friday, we're pouring at the RESERVE event from 4:00-6:30 then hosting a winemaker dinner at Bistro Laurent with wines from Beaucastel and Tablas Creek at 7:00. On Saturday at the Paso Robles downtown park we'll be joining the Paso Robles wine community for the Grand Tasting from 12:00 to 4:00. Sunday at the vineyard we'll have "brunch style" bites starting at 10am and live music with Shawn Clark Family Band from 12:00-3pm.


Tablas Creek News

Jason Haas: 2015 Paso Robles Wine Industry Person of the Year

We were proud to learn that Tablas Creek Partner/GM Jason Haas was voted by his peers the 2015 Paso Robles Wine Industry Person of the Year.  His father, our founder Robert Haas, wrote this appreciation on our blog.

Wine Advocate: 15 Wines 90+ Points

In Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (Issue 220) 15 Tablas wines topped 90 points, including 2014 Esprit de Tablas (93-96), 2013 Panoplie (94-96), and 2014 Panoplie (95-97). Read the review » More press »

 


On the Tablas Blog

Spring Cleaning in the Vineyard: How Eliminating Surface Grasses Conserves Water

April 27, 2016
Think of each plant that's growing in a given plot of land as like a wick, with its roots delving into the soil for available moisture. If we had overabundant water, we might want to leave some surface weeds to keep levels more reasonable. Instead, in our California climate, eliminating competition from grasses and other surface plants is an essential part of our ability to dry farm. Tilling in the cover crop also allows the insects and microorganisms in the soil to start breaking down the surface biomass accumulated during the winter growth into nutrients that the vines will draw from in the coming months. Finally, the loosening of the soil creates an insulating layer at the surface that helps conserve the water deeper down.  Read More »