2012 Esprit de Tablas Blanc

Production Notes

The Tablas Creek Vineyard 2012 Esprit de Tablas Blanc* is a blend of three estate-grown varietals, propagated from budwood cuttings from the Château de Beaucastel estate. Roussanne provides the core richness, minerality, and flavors of honey and spice, while Grenache Blanc adds green apple and anise flavors, a lush mouthfeel and bright acids. Picpoul Blanc completes the blend, adding a saline minerality and tropical notes.

*Curious about the new name of our signature blends?  Please read about this change on our blog post.

The 2012 vintage was a classic Paso Robles vintage, warm and sunny, but with above-average yields thanks to average winter rainfall and the frost-reduced 2011 crop. Despite the warm summer, ripening was slowed due to the healthy crop levels, and harvest at a normal time starting in early September and finishing in late October. The resulting wines showed lush, juicy fruit, balanced by good acids, and should provide enormous early appeal. Our Roussanne was harvested between September 7th and October 22nd, Grenache Blanc between September 21st and October 15th, and Picpoul between October 4th and 15th.

The grapes for our Esprit de Tablas Blanc were grown on our 120-acre certified organic estate vineyard.

The fruit was whole cluster pressed, and fermented with native yeasts. The Roussanne was fermented in a balance of stainless steel fermenters, 60-gallon oak barrels, and one 1200-gallon foudre. The Grenache Blanc was fermented partially in stainless steel and also in one foudre, and the Picpoul Blanc was fermented in small neutral oak and stainless steel barrels. All the wines went through malolactic fermentation. The lots were selected and blended in April, and bottled in September 2013.

Tasting Notes

The 2012 Esprit de Tablas Blanc has an inviting nose of preserved lemon, panna cotta, green pear, buttered toast, anise and wet rocks. The mouth is rich but dry, with flavors of butterscotch, apple pie, marmalade, candied pineapple and ginger, and gentle acids keeping things clean. The long finish is luscious and spicy with lingering flavors of peach pit, gingersnap and mineral. Absolutely delicious now, so don't feel bad about opening one soon. But it you want to age it, we expect it to go out 15 years or more and to gain nuttiness and complexity with time.

Reviews

[...more recent Tablas Creek press]

Recipe Suggestions

[...more recipes]

Food Pairings

  • Cooked shellfish (lobster, softshell crab, shrimp)
  • Roasted or grilled vegetables (eggplant, asparagus, peppers)
  • Foods cooked with garlic and olive oil
  • Rich fish dishes (i.e., salmon, swordfish)
  • Asian stir fry
$45.00

Blend

  • 75% Roussanne
  • 20% Grenache Blanc
  • 5% Picpoul Blanc

Technical Notes

  • 13.5% Alcohol
  • 2465 Cases Produced

Downloads

Events

Paso Robles Wine Festival

You're invited to join us for a weekend-long Wine Festival celebration Friday, May 20th through Sunday, May 22nd. Friday, we're pouring at the RESERVE event from 4:00-6:30 then hosting a winemaker dinner at Bistro Laurent with wines from Beaucastel and Tablas Creek at 7:00. On Saturday at the Paso Robles downtown park we'll be joining the Paso Robles wine community for the Grand Tasting from 12:00 to 4:00. Sunday at the vineyard we'll have "brunch style" bites starting at 10am and live music with Shawn Clark Family Band from 12:00-3pm.


Tablas Creek News

Jason Haas: 2015 Paso Robles Wine Industry Person of the Year

We were proud to learn that Tablas Creek Partner/GM Jason Haas was voted by his peers the 2015 Paso Robles Wine Industry Person of the Year.  His father, our founder Robert Haas, wrote this appreciation on our blog.

Wine Advocate: 15 Wines 90+ Points

In Robert Parker's Wine Advocate (Issue 220) 15 Tablas wines topped 90 points, including 2014 Esprit de Tablas (93-96), 2013 Panoplie (94-96), and 2014 Panoplie (95-97). Read the review » More press »

 


On the Tablas Blog

Spring Cleaning in the Vineyard: How Eliminating Surface Grasses Conserves Water

April 27, 2016
Think of each plant that's growing in a given plot of land as like a wick, with its roots delving into the soil for available moisture. If we had overabundant water, we might want to leave some surface weeds to keep levels more reasonable. Instead, in our California climate, eliminating competition from grasses and other surface plants is an essential part of our ability to dry farm. Tilling in the cover crop also allows the insects and microorganisms in the soil to start breaking down the surface biomass accumulated during the winter growth into nutrients that the vines will draw from in the coming months. Finally, the loosening of the soil creates an insulating layer at the surface that helps conserve the water deeper down.  Read More »